FEAR or FAITH? FRIGHT or FLIGHT?
Welcome Eagles to the New Crusade!
Will thou help defend the Fortress of Faith?

BOOKMARK us & check in DAILY for the latest Endtimes News!
SPREAD WORD TO YOUR FRIENDS & FAMILY!

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Earth Changes: North Pole forecast to warm 50 degrees above normal Thursday

Earth Changes: North Pole forecast to warm 50 degrees above normal Thursday
Latest Earth Changes.  Planet X Incoming/Pole Shift


It’s not normal, and it’s happening again. For the second year in a row in late December and for the second time in as many months, temperatures in the high Arctic will be freakishly high compared to normal. Computer models project that on Thursday, three days before Christmas, the temperature near the North Pole will be an astronomical 40-50 degrees
warmer-than-normal and approaching 32 degrees, the melting point.



On some forecast maps simulating Arctic temperatures, the color bar does not even go as high as predicted levels. The warmth will be drawn into the Arctic by a powerhouse storm east of Greenland. The European weather model estimates its lowest pressure will be around 945 millibars, which is comparable to many category 3 hurricanes. READ MORE

Thundersnow hits Hawaii’s volcanoes

Another round of snow — including reports of thundersnow — blanketed the summits of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawaii on Sunday and Monday. Mauna Kea park rangers reported “significant snowfall with continuous thunder and lightning over the summits,” the National Weather Service in Honolulu tweeted late Sunday.
Upward motion of air (which meteorologists call convection) helps produce thunderstorms. But it’s fairly rare to have convection within a winter storm. Thunder and lightning are much more common in warm-season thunderstorms, according to meteorologist Jeff Haby. When there’s strong enough convection, along with plenty of moisture available, a winter storm can produce thundersnow. READ MORE

Sahara Desert Sees Snow For First Time In 37 Years

Amateur photographer Karim Bouchetata took incredible pictures of snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra, Algeria, yesterday afternoon. He captured the amazing moment snow fell on the red sand dunes in the world’s largest hot desert for the first time in 37 years. Snow was last seen in Ain Sefra on February 18, 1979, when the
snow storm lasted just half an hour. This time the snow stayed for a day in the town, which is around 1000 metres above sea level and surrounded by the Atlas Mountains. Karim said: “Everyone was stunned to see snow falling in the dessert, it is such a rare occurrence. READ MORE

Naples astride a rumbling mega-volcano

December 20, 2016

Since 2005, Campi Flegrei has been undergoing what scientists call "uplift", causing Italian authorities to raise the
Since 2005, Campi Flegrei has been undergoing what scientists call "uplift", causing Italian authorities to raise the alert level in 2012 from green to yellow, signalling the need for active scientific monitoring
A slumbering Campi Flegrei volcano under the Italian city of Naples shows signs of "reawakening" and may be nearing a critical pressure point, according to a study published Tuesday.
Italian and French scientists have for the first time identified a threshold beyond which rising magma under the Earth's surface could trigger the release of fluids and gases at a 10-fold increased rate.
This would cause the injection of high-temperature steam into surrounding rocks, said lead author Giovanni Chiodini, a researcher at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Bologna.
"Hydrothermal rocks, if heated, can ultimately lose their mechanical resistance, causing an acceleration towards critical conditions," he told AFP by email.
It is not possible at this time to say when—or if—the volcano will erupt anew, he said.
If it did, however, "it would be very dangerous" for the half-million people living inside and near the caldera, he added, using the scientific name for the bowl-like depression created after a volcano blows its top.
Since 2005, Campi Flegrei has been undergoing what scientists call "uplift", causing Italian authorities to raise the alert level in 2012 from green to yellow, signalling the need for active scientific monitoring.
The pace of and low-level seismic activity has recently increased.
Two other active volcanoes—Rabaul in Papua New Guinea, and Sierra Negra in the Galapagos—"both showed acceleration in ground deformation before eruption with a pattern similar to that observed at Campi Flegrei," Chiodini said.
The Campi Flegrei caldera was formed 39,000 years ago in a blast that threw hundreds of cubic kilometres of lava, rock and debris into the air.
It was the largest eruption in Europe in the past 200,000 years, according to scientists.
Campi Flegrei last erupted in 1538, though on a much smaller scale.
Nearby Mount Vesuvius, whose massive eruption in 79 AD buried several Roman settlements in the area, including Pompeii, is also classified as an .
The dense urban population at risk "highlights the urgency of obtaining a better understanding of Campi Flegrei's behaviour," Chiodini said.
The study was published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.